Conversations on Commenting

… thoughts on commenting in general and on blogs in particular.

One of the most important tasks of a blogger is to set up a commenting policy. It doesn’t matter whether a person writes for a blog professionally or works on a site for fun and family — a clear statement on comments is necessary. The Props Blog, a good source for blogging information, features this informative post, The 10 Commandments of Commenting. I’ve rewritten these 10 commandments for my students using “Thou shalls” rather than “Thou shall nots,” and I’ve attached this document at the end of the post.

In today’s world, many people do not understand the purpose of commenting, and only recently have many websites started to set limits. Moreover, the rough and tumble, devil-may-care attitude that many people assume as they navigate the web (see newspapers — paper or electronic — for the latest digital scandals) leads to individuals not always thinking before they write, send, and post. I wrote a post, also titled Conversations on Commenting, sharing more of my views on this subject.

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All About WordPress Widgets! Lesson #12

Widgets are mini programs or applications that create digital tools, and these tools can be added to a blog to perform various functions.

The part of WordPress (WordPress.com) that provides free blog access also offers widgets for people to use on their blogs. However, in order to manage and protect these free blogs, WordPress limits widget access to a small number (thousands of widgets are available for blogs out in the blog world). Too many widgets that are not vetted can open the door to digital problems, and WordPress wants to avoid these digital difficulties as much as possible.

You can read this interesting blog post at the Edublogger site, Getting More Out of Widgets, but all of the information may not be specific to WordPress blogs.

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Attending to You Blog’s Settings, Lesson #10

On the left hand side of the WordPress dashboard is a long list of links that you can use to accomplish various tasks on your blogs – new posts, links, comments, new tags, etc. If you mouse over some of them you’ll discover an arrow on the right-hand side of each link that expands the category. For instance, if you click on the arrow next to the word post, the menu expands to include five additional links that relate to making posts on your blog. The dashboard is filled with all sorts of activities to do, and as you become more experienced you can expand your skills and learn about more  of the dashboard opportunities.

The most important dashboard menu for you to explore is settings. Below I’ve explored a few of the most important settings, General, Reading, and Discussion. Read the tutorial at WordPress for more detailed information. Continue reading

Adding Links to Your Post, Lesson #9

Several people have e-mailed me with questions about making links in posts. They’ve requested a set of simple but clear steps. So here we go. To learn more go to this Word Press Links Tutorial.

Four Steps to Link Making

Step #1

A link name is much better if it has descriptive words rather than an address. Thus Visit GDS is a better name Visit GDS http://www.gds.org.

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Getting Started With Your Blog, Lesson #7, Part 2

If you seriously get started setting up your new blog, please send me the link so I can check it out!

Course Questions and Inquiries: Lesson #4

If you have a question, please add it as a comment to this post.  Your thoughts, ideas, cries for help, and other inquiries are most welcome. As much as possible Marti will check for questions on a daily basis.  Some answers will be in the form of comments on this post, while others may be significant enough to merit a separate blog post.

So What Are Blogs Anyway? Lesson #3

Video, from the series, “In Plain English.” published on YouTube. WordPress makes it  easy to add a YouTube video, and I’ll post more about YouTube in a later lesson.